2015 MLB Preview: AL West

(Author’s Note: Sorry about the delay in posts, I’m going to try to complete this preview within the next week or so). The AL West was one of the best divisions in baseball in 2014, despite the dreadful duo of the Texas Rangers and Houston Astros at its tail end. The Los Angeles Angels, the Oakland Athletics, and the Seattle Mariners were either in the playoffs or in the hunt until the very last day. The AL West should remain fairly vicious this year, with those same three teams winning plenty of games. I do think two playoff teams will again emerge from the division this season, but the A’s will not be one of them.

Divisional Breakdown

  1. Los Angeles Angels
  2. Seattle Mariners
  3. Oakland Athletics
  4. Houston Astros
  5. Texas Rangers

Team Breakdown

  1. Los Angeles Angels

On the strength of unexpectedly solid starting pitching and Mike Trout’s first MVP season, the Angels won the most games in the league and took home the AL West title before falling to the spunky Kansas City Royals in the ALDS. The Angels’ roster didn’t change much over the offseason, which is a good thing when talking about a 98 win team. The Angels had the top-run producing offense last year, and the lineup should remain potent. Mike Trout is an outstanding talent and a perennial MVP candidate, Kole Calhoun is very good in right field, and Albert Pujols’ remaining efficacy has often been underrated in recent years. While the loss of Howie Kendrick to the crosstown Dodgers hurts, the upgrade from C.J. Cron to Matt Joyce at DH should make up for lost production. The rotation has the potential to be very good. I’m not the biggest fan of Jered Weaver or C.J Wilson, but each had a decent 2014 and can contribute in a solid rotation. The key factors in this staff are Garrett Richards and 2014 Rookie of the Year runner up Matt Shoemaker. If Richards can return (in mid-April) pitching like he did last year, and if Shoemaker can replicate his rookie year performance, the Angels’ rotation will be in good shape. If new addition Andrew Heaney can come up and contribute to the staff at some point, even better. The bullpen is in better shape than it was at the beginning of last year, with Huston Street installed as closer. Street and setup man Joe Smith form one of the better one-two bullpen combinations in the big leagues.

Verdict

Best Case- Trout wins his second straight MVP, Richards and Shoemaker are dominant once again, and the Angels take the AL West on the way to the AL pennant.

Worst Case- Age takes its toll on Pujols, Wilson, and Weaver, Richards doesn’t look the same after the injury, and the Angels fall behind the Mariners in the division.

Trout and the Angels willl be fishing for a championship in 2015.

  1. Seattle Mariners

The Mariners had a pretty good 2014, winning their most games since 2007. Robinson Cano was a welcome addition into Seattle’s lineup, Kyle Seager showed himself to be one of the better third basemen in the leagues, and Felix Hernandez added yet another fantastic season onto his resumé. The Mariners enter the season poised to return to the playoffs for the first time since 2001, thanks to several key offseason acquisitions who should complement the incumbent stars well. Nelson Cruz should provide much-needed power in the heart of the lineup, and Seth Smith and Austin Jackson will make the Mariners’ once-weak outfield respectable. Meanwhile, the Mariners have one of the most fearsome rotations in baseball. King Felix and Hisashi Iwakuma are a dominant one-two punch, and hopefully 2015 will be the year that Taijuan Walker shows the hype surrounding him to be true. The bullpen arms will aim to repeat the standard they set in 2014, when Seattle had the lowest bullpen ERA of any major league team. Closer Fernando Rodney is among the best in baseball, and Tom Wilhelmsen and Danny Farquhar both had sub-3 ERAs last season. The Mariners should hold on to the lead in a lot of close games this year.

Verdict

Best Case- Hernandez is a Cy Young candidate, Cano and Seager are tops at their positions, and the Mariners win the AL West for the first time since 2001.

Worst Case- Walker cannot produce at the major league level, Cruz cannot replicate his powerful production of last year, and the Mariners just miss out on a wild card spot.

Hernandez and Cano must be on the top of their games for the Mariners to reach the postseason.

  1. Oakland Athletics

The A’s looked like the best team in baseball last season, until several ill-fated trades aimed to make Oakland even more formidable ended up backfiring. The midseason acquisitions of Jon Lester and Jeff Samardzija served only to rid the team of Yoenis Cespedes and prospect Addison Russell. Somewhat poetically, Lester was on the mound for the epic Wild Card Game loss to the Kansas City Royals. Perhaps in response, the 2015 offseason has been one of massive turnover for the A’s roster. Gone are Lester, Samardzija, Josh Donaldson, Derek Norris, Brandon Moss, John Jaso, and Jed Lowrie, key components of the successful A’s squads of the past few years. In their place are several promising pieces which, if everything pans out, could turn out to be extremely valuable. The lineup is interesting blend of speed and power, with Coco Crisp and Billy Butler serving as examples of each attribute. Brett Lawrie, Ben Zobrist, and Josh Reddick form a solid heart of the batting order, but it remains to be seen if Ike Davis can be a starting first-bagger at the big league level. Similarly, the rotation could be very good, but there are nagging question marks. Sonny Gray and Scott Kazmir are a solid top two in the staff, but after that, things look a bit rough. Jesse Chavez appeared to revive his career, and the A’s will count on him to continue his success in 2015. The bullpen, 3rd in the league in reliever ERA last year, should be good, with former Nat Tyler Clippard assuming the closing role in place of the injured Sean Doolittle. Once the latter returns, the two should form an imposing end-of-game pair.

Verdict

Best Case- The rotation holds together, Billy Beane’s roster gambles pay off, and the new-look A’s take back the AL West title.

Worst Case- The new lineup doesn’t mesh, the rotation is a tire fire beyond Gray and Kazmir, and the Athletics fall behind– gulp– the Astros in the AL West.

Jesus- sorry, Josh Reddick and the new-look A’s hope to maintain the team’s recent success.

  1. Houston Astros

It’s difficult to imagine that a team that went 70-92 could be considered improved, but the 2014 Astros were Houston’s most successful squad since 2010. There were several brights spots for Houston– George Springer’s powerful debut, the breakout seasons of Dallas Keuchel and Collin McHugh — but the brightest of all was diminutive second baseman Jose Altuve, who took home the AL batting title. Although the Astros won’t quite be in playoff contention in 2015, there should be plenty of hope for the future in Houston. The lineup is improved, even with the departure of Dexter Fowler. New additions Jed Lowrie and Colby Rasmus should be solid replacements at short and in center, and Evan Gattis, Chris Carter, and Springer form a powerful middle of the lineup. The lineup will look even better if Jon Singleton can realize his potential at first, and if Carlos Correa and his impressive bat can reach the majors by September. The rotation is less impressive at the moment, but it has the potential to be fairly good. If Keuchel and McHugh continue their 2014 success, new acquisition Dan Straily produces at the level he did in his rookie season, and top prospect Mark Appel impresses enough to reach the Show this season, the Astros might begin to scare some teams around the league. The bullpen, statistically the worst in the league last year, should be much improved. Luke Gregerson and Pat Neshek are two of the better righty relievers in the league, so things should be a little less hopeless in the Houston ‘pen this year.

Verdict

Best Case- Houston’s pitchers realize their potential, the position player prospects impress, and the Astros are in the wild card race until late in the year.

Worst Case-  Correa and Appel suffer more setbacks, McHugh and Keuchel struggle, and the Astros finish in the AL West cellar.

Jose Altuve waves goodbye to the 60-win seasons of the past few years.

  1. Texas Rangers

The American League’s worst team in 2014, the injury-plagued Rangers looked nothing like their competitive teams of the last several years. Even though many of the Rangers’ struggles could be linked back to injuries to star players like Prince Fielder and Yu Darvish, I don’t believe that Texas will be much better this year. Darvish is hurt again, and Fielder and Shin-Soo Choo have yet to display why Texas invested $300 million in them as free agents last offseason. The lineup is ok, with perennial All-Star Adrian Beltre at third and Elvis Andrus at short, and should become better midway through the season, when minor league phenom Joey Gallo is projected to reach the majors. Still, Jurickson Profar has been set back yet again with injury issues, and the rest of the lineup just isn’t that eye-popping. Unless Fielder and Choo can return to their past levels of performance, Texas might have a difficult time scoring runs. The rotation is pretty unintimidating, especially without Darvish. Yovani Gallardo and Derek Holland are good starting pitchers, but not good enough to carry a rotation of Ross Detweiller, Colby Lewis, and Nick Martinez to the postseason. The bullpen was already going to be a weak spot on the team after the departures of Joakim Soria and Jason Frasor over the past year, but an injury-plagued spring has made the situation even worse. Closer Neftali Feliz will have to carry the load for Texas in the ‘pen.

Verdict

Best Case- Gallardo and Holland impress, Fielder, Choo, and Beltre form a solid core of the lineup, and the Rangers reinsert themselves into the wild card conversation.

Worst Case- The rotation and bullpen are disasters, Fielder and Choo look like shells of their former selves, and the Rangers are once again one of the worst teams in the league.

For the Rangers to have a shot at the postseason, Prince Fielder will have to stay on the field.

Leave a comment

Filed under Baseball, MLB Preview

2015 MLB Preview: AL Central

Even though the Detroit Tigers won the AL Central for the fourth straight year in 2014, the Kansas City Royals had the more memorable season, reaching the postseason and the World Series for the first time since 1985 before losing to the San Francisco Giants in seven games. Despite the relative success of these two squads last year, however, I don’t think either one will be returning to the postseason in 2015. The Minnesota Twins will be better as their highly-touted prospects begin to arrive in the Show, and the Cleveland Indians have a formidable lineup to send out alongside AL Cy Young winner Corey Kluber. But I think the Chicago White Sox will be the team to end Detroit’s domination of the Central and to take the divisional crown for the first time since 2008.

Divisional Breakdown

  1. Chicago White Sox
  2. Cleveland Indians
  3. Detroit Tigers
  4. Kansas City Royals
  5. Minnesota Twins

Team Breakdown

  1. Chicago White Sox

The White Sox had a fairly discouraging 2014, with the team falling out of the AL Wild Card race after a terrible August. However, there were several bright spots, the most exciting of which being AL Rookie of the Year Jose Abreu. This year, the White Sox will depend on the 28 year old Cuban to be the key cog in a revamped lineup. The White Sox had one of the splashiest offseasons of any team in the league, adding OBP master Melky Cabrera and the powerful Adam Laroche into the fold. These two will be welcome additions into a lineup that doesn’t boast many household names. In addition to the improved lineup, the White Sox boast an imposing trio of starting pitchers: Chris Sale (my Cy Young pick), new acquisition Jeff Samardzija, and the underrated Jose Quintana. Although Sale is currently injured, and although the rest of the rotation is somewhat underwhelming, these three should serve Chicago well come October. Strides were also made to improve a bullpen that was among the worst in the league last season. New closer David Robertson and lefty Zach Duke should help the White Sox lock down a few more games over the course of 2015.

Verdict

Best Case- Sale, Samardzija, and Quintana are dominant, Abreu is an MVP candidate, and the White Sox win the AL Central.

Worst Case- Sale’s foot doesn’t heal properly, Robertson and Duke cannot fix Chicago’s bullpen troubles, and the White Sox are stuck at home in October.

I feel obligated to use this image whenever Chris Sale comes up in a post.

  1. Cleveland Indians

The Indians had a fairly good 2014 season, finishing 3 games back in the AL Wild Card race. Breakout seasons from Cy Young winner Corey Kluber and Michael Brantley, who finished third in the AL MVP race, should have Indians fans very excited for 2015. Overall, this is a pretty solid baseball team. In addition to Brantley, the lineup boasts the underrated catcher Yan Gomes, the powerful Carlos Santana, and the newly acquired Brandon Moss, who should improve production out of right field. And if Jason Kipnis can return to his 2013 All-Star form, the Indians’ lineup might be among the best in baseball. The rotation is also promising, headlined by Kluber and filled with young fireballers. Getting production out of Carlos Carrasco and Trevor Bauer will be particularly important if the Indians hope to compete this year. The bullpen is fairly solid, with no key departures from a squad that finished 7th in the league in reliever ERA. While I don’t know if I agree with Sports Illustrated’s prediction that the Indians will win the World Series, Cleveland will certainly be a formidable opponent in 2015.

Verdict

Best Case- The rotation is overwhelming, Brantley, Gomes, and Kipnis produce at a high level, and the Indians take home the AL Central title.

Worst Case- The young guns in the rotation show little development, the breakout seasons of last year appear to be a fluke, and Cleveland misses the playoffs for the second straight year.

Tests have confirmed that Kluber is not a robot, but he does exude a machine-like efficiency from the mound.

  1. Detroit Tigers

The Tigers missed yet another opportunity to bring home their first World Series title since 1984 when they lost to the Baltimore Orioles in the ALDS. Now, they try to do so in an AL Central that has improved, and with a team that is quite different than last year’s. Any lineup with Miguel Cabrera will produce a fair amount of runs. Adding Ian Kinsler, Victor Martinez, and J.D Martinez into the equation in 2014 resulted in the Tigers scoring the second-most of any team last season. Jose Iglesias will return, intent on matching the offensive production and defensive wizardry of his rookie season, newcomer Anthony Gose will try to be a serviceable replacement to Austin Jackson in center, and Yoenis Cespedes will attempt to inflate the value of his next contract with a big season. While the lineup appears to be as strong as ever, Detroit’s rotation and bullpen are filled with question marks. Gone are Max Scherzer, Rick Porcello, and Drew Smyly. In their place stand David Price, Alfredo Simon, and Shane Greene. I don’t know that the replacements will be able to match the production of their predecessors, a statement made even more concerning by the fact that no one knows if Justin Verlander will ever be the same pitcher that he was in 2011 again. I believe the Tigers’ rotation will be solid, but I’m not sure that they’ll match the dominance of the 2013 squad. Meanwhile, the team did little to improve what was an absolute mess of a bullpen in 2014. Joe Nathan is back, coming off one of the worst years of his career, and disappointing midseason acquisition Joakim Soria returns as well. It is up to those two, as well as the resigned Joba Chamberlain, to provide some stability to what has been consistently the worst aspect of Detroit’s team.

Verdict

Best Case- Miggy and Victor Martinez are MVP candidates, Verlander and Price look like their old selves, and the Tigers win their fifth consecutive AL Central crown.

Worst Case- The aging lineup is injury-riddled, the new pitching acquisitions can’t match the production of last year’s squad, and the Tigers miss the playoffs for the first time since 2010.

Verlander and Price need to pitch like their old selves if the Tigers are to win this division.

  1. Kansas City Royals

The Royals shocked the world in 2014, sweeping their way to the World Series from the wild card game before finally falling to the San Francisco Bumgarners– sorry, the San Francisco Giants in seven games. Unfortunately, after losing three key members of that magical run- James Shields, Nori Aoki, and Billy Butler- and not matching some of the louder moves of their divisional rivals, I don’t think they’ll be returning to the postseason. The lineup is still quite solid and defensively elite, with Gold Glovers Salvador Perez, Eric Hosmer, and Alex Gordon all back at their respective posts. Newcomers Alex Rios and Kendrys Morales will attempt to produce at DH and RF, but both had fairly mediocre 2014s, which can be tough to come back from on the wrong side of 30. The rotation is solid, but will certainly miss its former ace Shields. Flamethrower Yordano Ventura and his fellow young gun Danny Duffy headline a staff that could be one of the better rotations in baseball, provided that Edinson Volquez can replicate his success of 2014. Chris Young is a nice end-of-the-rotation addition as well, and the signing of Kris Medlen (who will return later in the season from Tommy John surgery) could play a key role down the stretch. The core of the much-discussed Kansas City bullpen stayed relatively unchanged, with closer Greg Holland, Wade Davis, and Kelvin Herrera all returning. If they can perform as they did last year, the Royals will win a lot of close games.

Verdict

Best Case- Perez, Hosmer, and Gordon show they’re among the best at their positions, the rotation holds together despite the loss of Shields, and the Royals snag another wild card spot.

Worst Case- Morales and Rios aren’t suitable replacements, the rotation looks weak without Shields, and the Royals drop out of the wild card race by mid-September.

Ventura, seen here at his Rockettes audition, will bring 100+ MPH heat at the top of KC’s rotation.

  1. Minnesota Twins

The 2014 Twins were pretty bad, finishing in last place in the Central and not even getting a glimpse of the future after disappointing injuries to their two top prospects, Byron Buxton and Miguel Sano. While I don’t expect the Twins to be in contention this year, Minnesota could be a dangerous team come 2016. The lineup is filled with potential. Buxton and Sano are still stuck in the minors for the time being, but Aaron Hicks and Oswaldo Arcia have shown promise in the outfield, and Brian Dozier is one of the better second basemen in the league. Torii Hunter is back in Minnesota, returning to the team with which he spent the first nine full years of his career. While Buxton may very well steal his job when he finally arrives in the Bigs, Hunter will provide valuable veteran leadership (and may serve to put more Minnesotan butts in the seats). The rotation had the highest ERA of any AL team last year, but the addition of Ervin Santana should make things a little better. Phil Hughes had a terrific 2014 season and was rewarded with a 3-year, $42 million extension. Hughes and Santana alone aren’t enough to fix Minnesota’s pitching problems, though, and the back end of the Twins’ rotation will probably struggle. The bullpen is decent, with All-Star Glen Perkins closing games, but it is not very deep. The Twins may yet decide to pursue free agent closer Rafael Soriano to shore up their staff.

Verdict

Best Case- Buxton and Sano come up and impress, Arcia and Hicks emerge as key long-term pieces, and the Twins enter 2016 as a playoff favorite.

Worst Case- Buxton and Sano are again bitten by the injury bug, the rotation is a mess, and the window for contention moves even farther away than it already is.

On the bright side for 2015, Joe Mauer’s hair is still presumably dandruff-free.

Leave a comment

Filed under Baseball, MLB Preview

Why I Won’t Be Surprised if Notre Dame Takes Down Kentucky

There was some talk that West Virginia might be able to stun Kentucky Thursday night in the Sweet 16. Shane Battier was among those picking the Mountaineers to take down the mighty Wildcats.

Can Mike Brey, and his stars Jerian Grant (left) and Pat Connaughton (right) take down the might Wildcats?

Will Mike Brey, and his stars Jerian Grant (left) and Pat Connaughton (right) take down the mighty Wildcats?

I didn’t buy West Virginia’s chances at all. The ‘Neers are a team that can’t shoot and isn’t great at handling the ball. Kentucky has been drilling teams like them since they plowed through Kansas–another talented, athletic, somewhat undisciplined team–back in November. Kentucky can outrun, outwork, and outjump any other school in the nation. They pressure teams into turnover after turnover. They get easy buckets without even breaking a sweat. They lob alley oops. They crash the boards. They swat seemingly every shot that goes up around the rim. They’re hard to score on and they’re just as tough to stop when they get out in the open court. They’re basically West Virginia on steroids. And it showed as Kentucky thrashed the ‘Neers, rolling to a 78-39 win. West Virginia shot brick after brick and failed spectacularly to stop UK in the post.

While the undefeated Wildcats have shown few flaws this year, they have shown the most cracks against teams that execute, shoot the ball well, and avoid turnovers. Columbia, of all teams, nearly pulled off an upset on Big Blue in December when the Lions rode some hot shooting, an effective 2-3 zone, and a relatively low turnover tally to a halftime lead. A few weeks later, Ole Miss shot 53% from deep and took ‘Tucky to overtime. UK escaped only thanks to hot shooting of their own (11-20 from 3). While simply shooting the lights out isn’t the only way to beat Kentucky–Texas A&M and LSU both took the Wildcats to the wire without hitting a barrage of threes, but both kept the turnover battle at least even–hitting jumpers and taking care of the ball is probably the most plausible strategy. So, what’s a team that shoots spectacularly, handles it well, and is generally unflappable? The Wildcats’ Elite 8 opponent, Notre Dame, of course!

Now, I’m not going to call for a Notre Dame upset of John Calipari’s crop of diaper dandies. Kentucky has been my national champion pick since the start of the dance, and I don’t have the chutzpah to predict anybody to stop the Wildcats’ train. But I do think that Notre Dame has a very real shot.

First of all, the 32-5 Fighting Irish are really good. They’re gritty. They fit the bill I’ve been describing: no team in the country is better, or more surgical offensively. They reflect the steady demeanor of their cool, unshakable coach Mike Brey. They don’t commit carless turnovers.

Roosevelt Jones' 23 points were not enough for Butler to halt the Irish.

Roosevelt Jones’ 23 points were not enough for Butler to halt the Irish.

The Irish are also wicked hot. They have won eight straight, taking down Louisville, Duke, and North Carolina along the way and grabbing an ACC ‘ship. Most recently, they have looked impressive in two thoroughly different NCAA Tournament games. First there was their Round of 32 overtime barfight against an excellent Butler team playing inspired basketball. It was a truly outstanding game of college hoop, with Butler star Roosevelt Jones putting forth a memorable performance. Neither team shot it well from the outside, and it was the type of defense-first game that high scoring teams like Notre Dame tend to wilt in come tourney time. The two veteran teams both left it all on the court, and nine guys logged 40+ minutes. In the end, though, it was the Irish that came out victorious, as defensive rock Steve Vasturia dropped in 20 for ND and studs Jerian Grant and Pat Connaughton shook off rough shooting nights to make big plays at both ends down the stretch. The Irish are undefeated in overtime this year, and they showed some serious toughness in their win over Butler.

Notre Dame got back to classic Notre Dame ball against Wichita State in the Sweet 16. Against an outstanding defensive Shocker squad, Notre Dame didn’t miss a beat, leading for most of the night and hitting on 55% of their shots in an 81-70 win that wasn’t even that close.

The Irish have shooters galore. Jerian Grant hits crazy shots. Pat Connaughton is as good a catch-and-shoot guy as you’ll find. Demetrius Jackson, Vasturia, and V.J. Beachem are all 40%+ three point shooters too. And they move the ball faster than Bill Raftery says “man to man.

Notre Dame’s weakness happens to matchup with a strength of Kentucky: size. Notre Dame lacks somewhat in that area, and while they defend outside decently, they’re not, well, Kentucky in the paint. That’s OK. If they get hot from the outside, and 6-10 forward Zach Auguste plays big, Notre Dame can still pull off the upset.

I’m not saying the Irish are going to get it done. But the ACC Champs are the real deal. And I’m not sure if Kentucky has faced a team as dynamic offensively as ND all year. Could Notre Dame be Kentucky’s kryptonite? Well, it is March, after all.

1 Comment

Filed under College Basketball

2015 MLB Preview: AL East

Hello, baseball fans, and welcome to the first College Sports Town divisional preview for the 2015 MLB season. I’m going to take a look at every team in the league, analyze each one’s offseason moves, and offer my prediction for what their respective seasons will look like. As always, I’m going to begin with the AL East. It has been a year of turnover for several teams in this division. The Tampa Bay Rays lost manager Joe Maddon and GM Andrew Friedman along with several promising young players, the Boston Red Sox could not bring back ace Jon Lester, and the New York Yankees said goodbye to a little-known shortstop named Derek Jeter (perhaps you heard something about his retirement?). Will any of these teams be able to adjust to these changes well enough to challenge the Baltimore Orioles for the division crown?

Divisional Breakdown

  1. Baltimore Orioles
  2. Boston Red Sox
  3. Toronto Blue Jays
  4. Tampa Bay Rays
  5. New York Yankees

Team Breakdown

  1. Baltimore Orioles

Powered by Nelson Cruz’ league-leading 40 home runs and the stellar play of Adam Jones, the Orioles had a terrific 2014, winning 96 games before falling to the Kansas City Royals in the ALCS. This season, the Orioles will return a fairly familiar roster. Though Nelson Cruz will be missed in the middle of the lineup, new acquisition Delmon Young aims to provide production in the DH role. And though someone other than Nick Markakis patrolling right field at Camden Yards seems strange, Travis Snider is a promising replacement. The most important acquisitions of the offseason for the Orioles were the returns from injury for Manny Machado, Chris Davis, and Matt Wieters. If these star players can return to form, the Orioles will be a formidable offensive threat once again in 2015. With a rotation that remains fairly solid yet unremarkable, and a serviceable bullpen, Baltimore will once again depend on the core of their lineup to power the team to victory.

Verdict

Best Case- Jones is stellar yet again, Machado, Davis, and Wieters are All-Stars once more, and the Orioles win the AL East for the second straight year.

Worst Case- Cruz’ production cannot be replaced, Baltimore’s core of stars is injury-riddled once again, and Baltimore falls short of a playoff spot.

If Chris Davis can return to his 2013 form, the Orioles will take flight once again.

  1. Boston Red Sox

The Red Sox have for several years been the bane of my prognosticating career, as the squad has bounced from last place in the AL East in 2012 to a World Series championship in 2013, then back to last place in 2014. However, I have confidence that I have finally pegged them accurately as a wild card team in this upcoming season. Just like their division rivals the Orioles, the highlight of this Red Sox team is the lineup. Joining Boston mainstays David Ortiz and Dustin Pedroia are Hanley Ramirez and Pablo Sandoval, who both signed massive contracts this past November, and my Rookie of the Year pick Rusney Castillo. The Red Sox should score plenty of runs, especially if young players like Castillo, Mookie Betts, and Xander Bogaerts produce adequately. The concern for this squad lies with the pitching staff. Jon Lester chose to go to Chicago rather than headline this bunch of solid yet unspectacular starters. Presumptive ace Clay Buchholz is wildly inconsistent and oft-injured, and it remains to be seen if solid pitchers Wade Miley, Rick Porcello, and Justin Masterson can maintain a higher level of success. The bullpen is decent, with Koji Uehara closing, but is filled with question marks like Craig Breslow and and Edward Mujica. The pitching staff has the potential to be quite good, but it might also be a disaster.

Verdict

Best Case- The offense fires on all cylinders, the staff impresses, and the Red Sox win the AL East.

Worst Case- Ortiz shows his age, the offense can’t score enough to make up for lackluster pitching, and the Red Sox miss out on the playoffs again.

Pablo Sandoval, pictured here with his brother, will be a key component of the Red Sox lineup.

  1. Toronto Blue Jays

The 2014 Blue Jays performed decently, finishing third in the AL East after falling behind in a tight AL Wild Card race. Toronto followed that performance with perhaps the splashiest offseason in the AL East. In addition to acquiring Michael Saunders and Russell Martin, the Blue Jays traded Brett Lawrie and prospects to the Oakland A’s for All-Star Josh Donaldson. Though Melky Cabrera will be missed at the top of the lineup and Colby Rasmus will be missed in center, Toronto’s offensive production should be similar to last year, when the Jays scored the fifth most runs in the league. In what is seemingly a trend in the AL East, the weakest part of this team is the pitching staff. R.A. Dickey and Mark Buehrle are solid but old, and the loss of the promising Marcus Stroman to an ACL tear will hurt. Toronto will have to hope Aaron Sanchez and Daniel Norris can live up to their potential and fill the voids in this rotation. In the bullpen, Brett Cecil will take over closing duties from the departed Casey Janssen. Toronto had one of the worst bullpen ERAs in the MLB last year, so hopefully this shakeup will improve things.

Verdict

Best Case- The offense is imposing, Sanchez and Norris pitch well, and the Jays return to the postseason for the first time since 1993.

Worst Case- Martin is injured, the staff shows its age, and Toronto finishes last in the AL East.

Josh Donaldson, attempting to taste the Canadian air, is a welcome addition to the Jays.

  1. Tampa Bay Rays

After finishing under .500 for the first time since 2007, Tampa Bay overhauled their roster and front office. In addition to the aforementioned departures of Maddon and Friedman, the Rays traded away or let walk key players including Ben Zobrist, Yunel Escobar, and Wil Myers. The new Rays lineup might not be worse than that of last year, when the Rays scored the fewest runs in the AL, but it is not that impressive. New manager Kevin Cash will have to hope for bounceback years from Evan Longoria and James Loney if he wants to be competitive in 2015. John Jaso should provide power in the DH spot and highly-touted prospect Steven Souza will, at the very least, provide stellar defense in the outfield. The Rays might have the best rotation in the AL East, which is impressive considering the youth of their starters. Chris Archer, Alex Cobb, and Jake Odorizzi all performed quite well last year, and Drew Smyly, acquired in the David Price trade with Detroit, has looked tremendous in his brief Rays stint. It will be up to them to keep games close for this relatively weak offense. Tampa’s bullpen is a bit of a mess at the moment, and it will be up to Brad Boxberger, Jake Mcgee, and new acquisition Kevin Jepsen to keep things relatively under control.

Verdict

Best Case- Longoria has an MVP-caliber year, the rotation is stellar, and the Rays sneak into a wild card spot.

Worst Case- The offense sputters, the inexperience of the rotation is on full display, and the Rays finish in the AL East cellar.

Evan Longoria, after realizing Maddon, Zobrist, and Price are gone.

  1. New York Yankees

Now, I’m not predicting that the Yankees will finish dead last in the AL East because it gives me great pleasure to do so (even if that may be true). The fact is, the Yankees overachieved during the 2014 Derek Jeter farewell tour- sorry, the 2014 season. The difference between their actual win-loss record and their expected (Pythagorean) win-loss record was 7 games, as the Yankees led the American League in luck. Even though the Yankees did make some quality moves this offseason, I do not think that the 2015 team will be as competitive as last year’s. The lineup can be solid when everyone is healthy, but health could definitely be an issue for a team that depends on so many older players. Jacoby Ellsbury, Brett Gardner, and Chase Headley are all fairly good and should provide good production, but Carlos Beltran and Brian McCann had disappointing debut seasons in the Bronx and it will be up to them to turn things around, which can be tough when one is on the wrong side of 30. Also, Brian Cashman is presumably counting the days until he can replace Stephen Drew with Rob Refsnyder at second base. This is not to mention the return of Alex Rodriguez, likely to the DH spot from which he should provide a lot of drama, if not production. The rotation, like the lineup, can be pretty good when healthy, but that is a dubious assumption to make. Masahiro Tanaka was outstanding in his debut season, but his decision against Tommy John surgery for his partial UCL tear could come back to haunt him. Michael Pineda and C.C. Sabathia both have long injury histories, and both Chris Capuano and Ivan Nova will start the season on the DL. I’m a fan of Nate Eovaldi, whom the Yankees acquired from the Marlins, but there is a concerning lack of starting pitching depth for such an injury-filled rotation. The bullpen is the brightest spot on the team, with new acquisition Andrew Miller and Dellin Betances serving as a vicious end of game combo.

Verdict

Best Case- Tanaka’s arm holds up and he is a Cy Young candidate, the lineup stays healthy and productive, and the Yankees win a wild card spot.

Worst Case- Tanaka needs Tommy John, the rotation and lineup is filled with casualties, and the Yankees finish last in their division for the first time since 1990.

A-Rod, seen here attempting to bat with no hands, will bring even more drama into the Bronx this year.

Leave a comment

Filed under Baseball, MLB Preview

2015 MLB Preview: Playoff Picture and World Series

It’s time once again for my predictions for which teams will make the playoffs, and which team will come away from 2015 immortalized with a World Series trophy. As always, I expect to look back at some of these picks in October and wonder what I was thinking, but here are my best guesses as to which teams we will see playing this fall.

Divisional and Wild Card Winners

AL East– Baltimore Orioles

AL Central– Chicago White Sox

AL West– Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

AL Wild Card #1– Boston Red Sox

AL Wild Card #2– Seattle Mariners

NL East- Washington Nationals

NL Central– St. Louis Cardinals

NL West– Los Angeles Dodgers

NL Wild Card #1– New York Mets

NL Wild Card #2– Chicago Cubs

Wild Card Matches

AL- Seattle Mariners defeat Boston Red Sox

NL- New York Mets defeat Chicago Cubs

Divisional Round

AL- Los Angeles Angels defeat Seattle Mariners in 5 games, Chicago White Sox defeat Baltimore Orioles in 4 games

NL- Washington Nationals defeat New York Mets in 4 games, Los Angeles Dodgers defeat St. Louis Cardinals in 5 games

Championship Round

AL- Los Angeles Angels defeat Chicago White Sox in 6 games

NL- Washington Nationals defeat Los Angeles Dodgers in 7 games

World Series

Washington Nationals defeat Los Angeles Angels in 5 games

Harper and the Nationals will finally taste postseason success in 2015.

4 Comments

Filed under Baseball, MLB Preview

2015 MLB Preview: NL Awards

Hello, baseball fans, and welcome back to College Sports Town’s 2015 MLB Preview. I apologize for not posting since my AL Awards preview as I have been separated from my laptop, but, now that I’m back, let’s get right to it. Here are my picks for NL MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year in 2015.

NL MVP- Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh Pirates

McCutchen’s sweet stroke should keep him at the top of the MVP race.

Two years ago, I predicted Cutch would win his first MVP award, and he validated my prognosis. This year, I expect more of the same excellence from McCutchen, who led the NL in OBP and OPS last season. His candidacy will be aided by an improved Pirates lineup. Though catcher Russell Martin will be missed, new additions Corey Hart and Korean import Jung-ho Kang, not to mention an entire year from young outfielder Gregory Polanco, will solidify an already potent offense and make McCutchen’s life easier. McCutchen’s MVP odds will be further helped by the difficulties several other top candidates will have to deal with this season. Clayton Kershaw is unlikely to win another MVP even if he were somehow able to duplicate last year’s numbers, Troy Tulowitzki can’t seem to play enough games to be considered, and I still don’t know how long it will take Giancarlo Stanton to readjust after that terrible beaning last September. Thanks to these roadblocks, Cutch’s path to the 2015 NL MVP might just be as simple as producing numbers consistent with those of the past few years, which I believe he is more than capable of.

NL Cy Young- Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers

Last year, I tried to not select him. I predicted Jose Fernandez would win the Cy Young, not a ridiculous selection but one that proved to be inaccurate when Fernandez became yet another victim of the Tommy John epidemic. But I’ve come to the conclusion that I can’t reasonably predict anyone else but Kershaw to win this award. Kershaw, who came into 2014 already having won two Cy Youngs and arguably deserving a third, delivered a season for the ages, leading the league in wins, ERA, WHIP and several other categories. He tossed his first no-hitter, won his third Cy Young, and became the first pitcher since Justin Verlander in 2011 to win an MVP award. Oh, and he’s still only 27 years old. There are other outstanding pitchers in the National League, of course. Johnny Cueto, Adam Wainwright, and postseason hero Madison Bumgarner all deserve tremendous respect. However, when someone comes along and not only inspires comparisons to Sandy Koufax but validates them, it is difficult to expect anything less than greatness from him.

Kershaw should be dealing as always in 2015.

Kershaw should be dealing as always in 2015.

NL Rookie of the Year- Kris Bryant, Chicago Cubs

One of the prized cornerstones of the future for the Chicago Cubs, Kris Bryant has displayed in Spring Training the prestigious power that produced 43 home runs at the minor league level in 2014 and earned him the status of Baseball America’s #1 prospect. His six  home runs would normally be enough to earn him a spot on the opening day roster, but issues over long-term contract control will likely leave him in the minors for the few first weeks of the season. Still, Bryant has shown that the hype surrounding him is well-deserved. I expect him to rake from the moment he gets called up, and to become yet another reason for folks around the league to be afraid of the quickly improving Chicago Cubs.

Bryant thanking his bat for all it’s done for him.

Leave a comment

Filed under Baseball, MLB Preview

Thoughts on all 68 Tournament Teams

It’s time for the Big Dance. I’m pumped. After all, you can’t dance and stay uptight. Here are my thoughts on all 68 teams that will be dancing starting this evening.

West Region: 

Dekker and Kam

Wisconsin gets buckets.

1. Wisconsin: It’s hard not to like Wiscy. They don’t make mistakes. They don’t turn it over. They don’t miss free throws. Oh, they’re pretty damn athletic too. Frank Kaminsky and Sam Dekker make up one of the best 1-2 punches in college hoops.

2. Arizona: Arizona’s hotter than Uptown Funk right now (OK, maybe not THAT hot). The Wildcats have not lost since February. They also have a ridiculous point differential–they outscored opponents by an average of 18 points per game this year. For counter-culture hipsters not picking Kentucky to win it all, Arizona is a popular pick.

3. Baylor: Are there still people that think that Scott Drew is bad at his job? Well, he’s not. And the coach’s team is nasty this year. The Bears are hella athletic (per usual), and shoot it well from deep.

4. UNC: The Tar Heels came up short against Notre Dame in the ACC ‘ship, but Roy Williams’ team seems to be playing their best ball of the season. The Heels are physical, athletic, and they’re playing smarter basketball than they did the past couple of years. Nobody wants to play them right now.

5. Arkansas: Meh. This is a five seed?

6. Xavier: Xavier played up and down to their competition this year, losing to Long Beach State, Auburn, DePaul, Seton Hall, and Creighton, but also notching wins over Georgetown (x3), Providence, Cincinnati, and Butler (x2). Xavier’s balanced and efficient, but their lack of consistency might concern some.

Treveon Graham

Treveon Graham and VCU are coming into the tourney hot. Will they have a repeat of 2011?

7. I’m really high on VCU. The Rams defense is as advertised this year and they shoot the lights out from deep. They looked tremendous in the A-10 Tournament (still the most underrated conference in the nation IMO). Wing Treveon Graham is the total package. VCU has overcome injuries to get to this point, and I wouldn’t be remotely shocked if they made a deep run. The potential second round matchup with Arizona was a tough draw though.

8. Oregon: The Ducks are licking their wounds from the pounding they took against Arizona in the Pac-12 championship game. Oregon really struggled against ‘Zona this year; they got steamrolled each time they faced the Wildcats. But this is still a pretty good Oregon team and they got a great draw in ice cold Oklahoma State. Joseph Young, the Ducks’ senior guard, is dynamite.

9. Oklahoma State: The Cowboys are wicked talented. But man, they look they’re over this season like Holden Caulfield’s over high school. Ok State has lost six of their last seven going into the Dance.

10. Ohio State: This has been a pretty disappointing Ohio State team. They simply don’t play that hard. On the bright side, D’Angelo Russell is a huge stud and one of the most fun players to watch in the country. Also: Greg Paulus does more on the sideline than possibly any other assistant coach in the country (the dude never sits down).

11. BYU: Everybody knows that BYU can score, and the Cougars’ ball movement is tremendous. Tyler Hawes is one of the best players in college basketball. I really dig BYU as a sleeper.

11. Ole Miss: Not really sure how the Rebels are in the Tournament. I guess it’s a testament to how weak the bubble was, but there is no way Ole Miss was more deserving than Miami, which had basically the same record in a much better conference (oh, and a win at Duke). The Rebels do happen to be an extremely good free throw shooting team (78%).

12. Wofford: Wofford. Sounds a little like onomatopoeia, does it not?

Wesley+Saunders+Harvard+Crimson+v+Spokane+3OjnqNtRVAwl

For Harvard to make any noise this year, Wes Saunders will need to explode.

13. Harvard: They’re not as good as they’ve been the past two years, when they have won first round games against New Mexico and Cincinnati. Still, they’re dancing, and they had to get through a good Yale team in the Ivy race to get here. The Crimson struggle to score, but they’re one of the better teams in the tourney defensively. They’ll need huge production from star Wesley Saunders to get to the Round of 32 for the third straight year.

14. Georgia State: These guys can score in bunches. R.J. Hunter and Ryan Harrow are both offensive machines.

15. Texas Southern: The Tigers actually beat Michigan State back in December, so that’s nice. But let’s be honest, Florida Gulf Coast they are not.

16. Coastal Carolina: I feel like they’re a really good 16 seed. I mean, they almost beat Ole Miss in December and 24-9 isn’t your usual 16 seed record.

South Region:

1. Duke: The Blue Devils were my preseason pick to win it all, and I’m still high on the Blue Devils. Jahlil Okafor is a force, and Duke’s vicious offensively and much improved defensively. They’re still not great defensively though, and Duke seems to have mad mojo in March the past few years. I think this is the best Duke team since they won the it all in 2010.

2. Gonzaga: The Bulldogs have tremendous size, shoot the ball at a ridiculously high clip, and have plenty of depth. Kyle Wiltjer and Kevin Pangos are both outstanding and long range assassins. And forward Domantas Sabonis might be Danny‘s favorite college basketball player ever.

JT3

John Thompson’s teams have struggled recently in the March. Can this year’s talented GTown outfit buck the trend?

3. Iowa State: This is another deep team. Georges Niang is of course the star for the Cyclones. Fred Hoiberg’s team scores efficiently and dominates the boards. They’re a good bet to make the Sweet 16 for the second straight year.

4. Georgetown: The Hoyas had a nice bounce back year after missing the Dance last winter. Their blowout win over Villanova remains extremely impressive. Some eyebrows rose at how high Georgetown was seeded, but I think they’re very good. The Hoyas are balanced and methodical and junior D’Vauntes Smith-Rivera is one of the toughest guards in the tournament.

5. Utah: The Utes slowed down the stretch, but they’re a really good team and an outstanding defensive squad. Stephen F. Austin was kind of a sucky draw though.

6. SMU: After getting snubbed from the selection committee last year, SMU is in this year, and they’re deserving. The Mustangs won the AAC regular season and tournament championships and have been pretty consistent after a shaky (2-3) start to the season.

7. Iowa: I thought the Hawkeyes were really good last year, and then they wound up being sort of meh. This year I didn’t think they were any good, and now here they are in the tournament. Guess it goes to show I don’t know much. But I do know this: Iowa is a much better defensive team than they were a year ago.

8. San Diego State: It’s the same story for the Aztecs as last year–they can’t really score, but damn do they defend. The Aztecs are incredibly athletic for an 8 seed.

9. St. John’s: Speaking of athleticism, the Johnnies have plenty too. St. John’s has strong guard play and plays aggressive defense. They’re a streaky team though, both from game-to-game and from possession-to-possesion. Definitely not a team anybody wants to play.

Kalinoski-GW

Star guard Tyler Kalinoski looks to lead Davidson deep into March.

1o. Davidson: The A-10 regular season champs are legit. The Wildcats have nasty guard play and shoot the lights out. I like them a lot as a 10 seed. Their style of play seems to lead to March upsets…

11. UCLA: Another how the hell did this team make the tournament team. Weak bubble blah blah blah weak bubble.

12. Stephen F. Austin: Everybody’s favorite upset pick for a reason. SFA went 29-4 this year and gets up and down the court. They also force loads of turnovers and rebound decently for a smallish team.

13. Eastern Washington: These guys beat Indiana in a defense-optional game back in November. They can score it plenty, with scintillating scorer Tyler Harvey leading the way. They also might be the worst defensive team in the bracket.

14. UAB: The Conference USA champions were 4-9 at one point this season.

15. North Dakota State: Senior Bisons guard Lawrence Alexander is a RIDICULOUS shooter.

16. North Florida Ospreys: My Northwestern Wildcats beat these guys back in November. North Florida outplayed NU, but we won so #gocats!

16. Robert Morris: Their logo is vaguely similar to the New England Patriots’.

East Region: 

Darrun Hilliard and Ryan Arcidacono have Villanova poised for big things.

Can Darrun Hilliard and Ryan Arcidacono take ‘Nova to a title?

1. Villanova: Villanova quietly has been absurdly good this year. The Wildcats were seriously dominant at home (only Syracuse took them all the way down to the wire in Philly), didn’t lose in non-conference play, and absolutely steamrolled the rest of the Big East. Villanova doesn’t have the raw NBA talent of Kentucky or Duke, but they have an excess of offensive firepower, they’re deep, they’re experienced, and they have no glaring weaknesses. Point guard Ryan Arcidiacono is the a steady assassin who makes big shots, not mistakes.

2. Virginia: The Cavs play suffocating defense. UVA looked like a 1 seed for most of the season, but enters the tournament having lost two of three (both losses came to really good teams: Louisville and UNC). They have been playing for a while without forward Justin Anderson, who just came back from injury.  Virginia isn’t the trendiest team right now, but they’re a good bet to get fairly deep–they’re better offensively than a lot of people realize.

3. Oklahoma: The Sooners have serious game. They’re very, very hard to defend and they crash the boards hard. Guard Buddy Hield is a bigtime player.

4. Louisville: Louisville is a scary team. The Cardinals are unbelievably athletic and super well coached (per usual). They make games messy and play aggressive defense. Terry Rozier is a scary player to guard and Montrezl Harrell never gets outworked.

Seth Tuttle and UNI play precision basketball.

Seth Tuttle and UNI play precision basketball.

5. Northern Iowa: They kinda do their own thing. They play at a slow pace and control the game. There’s nothing the Panthers do that is all that flashy, but they seem to have a formula for success. They’ve got nasty shooters and they don’t make many mistakes. Seth Tuttle, the Panthers’ star, is sort of a personification of the team as a whole–he’s not a tremendous athlete or exceptionally skilled, but the numbers he puts up are nothing short of gaudy.

6. Providence: This is a really solid Providence team. Ed Cooley is as good as it gets as an in-game coach and he’s got a great mix of athleticism and shot makers to work with. LaDontae Henton and Kris Dunn do the bulk of PC’s scoring and both are ballers.

7. Michigan State: It was a down year in East Lansing, but the Spartans seem to be getting hot at the right time. The Spartans took down Maryland in the Big Ten Tournament and took Wisconsin to OT. As we know, Tom Izzo owns March.

8. NC State: A little De Ja Vu? NC State seems to win about 20 games each year and get a high-mid seed. There’s nothing that spectacular about NC State this year, and they lack the star power of past years, but they managed to beat some pretty darn good teams in the regular season (UNC, Louisville, Duke). The key for the Wolfpack has been their ability to hit the boards. They’re pretty small, and the don’t have any singular rebounding force, but they are great at team rebounding.

9. LSU: This is LSU’s first visit to the Dance since 2009. The Tigers make their living in the paint, and Jordan Mickey is one the nation’s best big men. Mickey averages nearly four blocks per game. He’s joined in the front court by Jarell Martin who scores a dash under 17 per game. Both are forces on the glass.

10. Georgia:  Much like LSU, Georgia bullies opponents with their size. They’re also pretty deep.

Derrick Marks and friends are proving that Boise isn't just a football school.

Derrick Marks and friends are proving that Boise isn’t just a football school.

11. Boise State: Derrick Marks is offensive dynamite for Boise State, which has been playing great ball for the past month.

11. Dayton: Last year’s Cinderella, Dayton has a shot at making it deep again. The Flyers lack in depth, but they play smart basketball. Forward Kendall Pollard has a great motor.

12. Wyoming: The Mountain West champions snuck by Boise State and San Diego State and into the NCAA Tournament. They’re a slow-it-down team and their first round battle with UNI should be a low scoring possesion-by-possesion battle. I wouldn’t be stunned if Wyoming pulled out an upset.

13.UC Irvine: Their center, Mamadou Ndiaye, is 7-6.

14. Albany: The Great Danes’ one point win over Stony Brook in the America East Championship was one of the ugliest basketball games I have ever watched. That being said, Albany is a pretty good 14 seed. They have lost just once since December.

15. Belmont: The Bruins robbed Murray State of a bid by knocking off the Racers in the Ohio Valley Championship. Belmont has had some pretty good teams in recent years, including their ’08 team which came a point away from beating a 2 seed Duke team.

16. Lafayette: Terrible defensive team, but the Leopards do score it at a decent rate.

Midwest Region

1. Kentucky: They’re great. And they are playing the best they have played all year.

2. Kansas: For some reason, I have yet to buy into this Kansas team. They have plenty of pro-level talent, but KU struggled all year away from Allen Fieldhouse and scoring can look surprisingly difficult at times for a Bill Self team. I think they’re good, but I honestly like the 3 seed from this region much more than the 2 seed.

Jerian Grant and Notre Dame know how to put the biscuit in the basket.

Jerian Grant and Notre Dame know how to put the biscuit in the basket.

3. Notre Dame: The ACC Champs are an offensive juggernaut. Guard Jerian Grant is one of the best guards in the country, but Notre Dame really kills opponents with the way they move the ball. They sling it around and get great shots. And they have wet shooters. Pat Connaughton is their best sniper. They’re a better defensive team than you think too.

4. Maryland: After three fairly uneventful seasons, Mark Turgeon finally delivered the goods to College Park this year, as Maryland enjoyed a hugely successful 27 win season highlighted by wins over Wisconsin and Iowa State. Dez Williams and Melo Trimble are studs.

5. West Virginia: I like West Virginia, which presses constantly, quite a bit. They make games ugly and excel at turning turnovers into points. The Mountaineers led college hoops in steals per game this year. They are the type of team that nobody wants to play, even though they’ve struggled a bit of late (three losses in their last four games).

6. Butler: The Bulldogs just play good, hardnosed basketball. Sharp shooting guard Kellen Dunham is Butler’s best player, but Roosevelt Jones, a severely undersized forward with a Draymond Green-esq game, might be their most important.

7. Wichita State: The hype from last year is gone, but the underseeded Shockers are still really good. Good enough to make some serious noise.

Octavius Ellis is Monta Ellis' cousin.

Octavius Ellis is Monta Ellis’ cousin.

8. Cincinnati: The Bearcats impressed me every time I watched them this year and play stifling defense. Their consistency is questionable, and they lack a go-to scorer, but they’ve managed to make it work with what they have, even with head coach Mick Cronin away from the team for medical reasons.

9. Purdue: Boring team.

10. Indiana: There’s nothing that bores me about Indiana, which is poorly constructed but super fun to watch. The Hoosiers lack bigs but have tremendous guards. Point man Yogi Ferrell is full speed ahead at all times, and he’s a nightmare to guard. Defensively, Indiana really gets out and guards at times. Other times…not so much.

11. Texas: Barring a surprising run, it looks like this will go down as yet another extremely talented Longhorns team that never put it all together.

12. Buffalo: The Bulls definitely can run and gun. Will they be able to keep their turnover tally low enough to take down West Virginia?

13. Valparaiso: Bryce Drew, Valpo’s fourth year coach, is the brother of Baylor’s Scott Drew.

14. Northeastern: The Boston college team in the Dance not named Harvard, Northeastern is an extremely efficient squad. They’re not very disruptive on defense though.

15. New Mexico State: The Aggies rolled through the WAC. The 13 game winning streak they’re on might make Bill Self and Kansas feel a little nervous.

16. Manhattan: Steve Masiello continues to work his magic. Manhattan gave Louisville a scare last March. Imagine if they give Kentucky a scare this year…

16. Hampton: Idk.

1 Comment

Filed under College Basketball