The Mets: Sputtering off the Tracks Like a Derailed 7 Line Car

Yesterday was a day of celebration at Citi Field. The weather was gorgeous. The ballpark was mostly full–an unusual and welcome sight. And 50 Cent closed the night with a 90 minute concert that rivaled Nas’ last year.

The Mets are 3-9 in June.

The Mets are 3-9 in June.

The only thing not worth celebrating: the hometown Mets. They put forth a putrid performance against the San Diego Padres, losing 5-0 and managing just two hits. Met starter Zack Wheeler saw his record fall to 2-7 while Jesse Hahn, starting just the second game of his career, embarrassed the Mets’ lineup in six innings of one-hit work. The loss, which came to a Padres team that entered the day 11 games under .500, left the Orange and Blue at 30-38 on the year.

While the Mets’ record is bad, their offense is worse. The two hit effort was a spectacular failure, but it also was hardly a shock given the Mets’ recent  track record. They currently hold the 29th best SLG% and the 28th best batting average in baseball. Their six through eight hole hitters are all dudes batting under .200. Even David Wright, the lone (healthy) star for the fledgling franchise, has been mediocre this year; to date he has a .327 OBP and .358 SLG%. The Mets’ best hitter this year has been none other than 40 year old Bobby Abreu, a late pickup who hasn’t played a full season since 2011. A few weeks ago, the Mets fired their hitting coach.

Let’s not mince words; the 2014 Mets are fairly pathetic. Caught somewhere in limbo, they are playing without their best player (injured pitcher Matt Harvey), with a joke of a starting lineup, and with a hodgepodge rotation that includes Bartolo Colon and Daisuke Matsuzaka.

The Mets’ pitching across the board actually isn’t horrible. Jon Niese and Dillon Gee are both solid starting pitchers in the midst of career years. (Although Gee is currently on the DL.) Nonetheless, this Mets team is depressingWith Harvey recovering from Tommy John surgery and Wright caught in a huge slump–and possibly the wrong side of his prime–the relatively good vibrations that were present during last summer’s 74 win campaign have faded.

The Mets recently sent 25 year oldTravid d'Arnaud, who was hitting .180 in 39 games, back to the minors.

25 year old Travid d’Arnaud, who was hitting .180 in 39 games, was recently sent back to the minors.

As was the case a year ago, the Mets’ struggles are packaged with a future that could hold some promise. Harvey, of course, is the center of that future. But, to borrow a quote from the endlessly quotable Yogi Berra, “the future ain’t what it used to be”. There’s no guarantee that  Harvey will return as the hard-throwing hero he was in ’13, and other supposed future stars like Wheeler and catcher Travis d’Arnaud have struggled in major ways this year. Meanwhile, the club’s financial issues remain an ever-present theme for the ball club.

Happy days still could be ahead for the team and their Flushing faithful. But on a day when the Mets got rolled by one of the league’s worst teams and, in the process, made a rookie pitcher look like Pedro in his prime, it’s hard to look at the franchise and see much to get excited about.

50 Cent once asked 21 Questions. It seems that New York Mets’ management might want to start asking some questions too.

 

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